This team of engineers is using one of the world's largest 3D metal printers to build rockets, and it could shake up the space industry as we know it.

Aerospace startup making 3D-printed rockets now has a launch site at America’s busiest spaceport

https://www.theverge.com/2019/1/17/18185136/relativity-space-3d-printing...

“America’s busiest spaceport in Cape Canaveral, Florida, is about to get a new tenant: a startup that shares SpaceX’s ambitious plans of turning humans into a multiplanetary species.”

NASA Tests First 3-D Printed Rocket Engine Part Made with Two Different Alloys

https://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/news/news/releases/2017/nasa-tests...

“Engineers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, tested NASA's first 3-D printed rocket engine prototype part made of two different metal alloys through an innovative advanced manufacturing process. NASA has been making and evaluating durable 3-D printed rocket parts made of one metal, but the technique of 3-D printing, or additive manufacturing, with more than one metal is more difficult.”

Relativity Space reveals its ambitions with big NASA deal

https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/03/relativity-space-reveals-its-amb...

“Relativity announced Wednesday that it has signed a 20-year partnership with NASA's Stennis Space Center for an exclusive lease of the 25-acre E4 Test Complex in Southern Mississippi. The four test stands on the site will allow Relativity to develop and test enough engines to build 36 rockets a year, and the agreement includes an option for the company to eventually expand its footprint at the site to 250 acres.”

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