Elite Dating Apps Are A DISASTER

Elite dating apps can exasperate income inequality. Cenk Uygur, Ana Kasparian, and Brett Erlich, the hosts of The Young Turks, break it down. http://www.tytnetwork.com/join

Tell us what you think in the comment section below.

Read more here: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-04-17/the-league-and-other-...

“Their romance began on a server at a San Francisco startup. Anna Wood had submitted a profile to the League, a dating app aimed at young professionals. She was the perfect prospect: Degree from a top university? Check. Management-track job at a marquee company? Check. Carefully selected profile pictures and a winning smile? Check and check.

The League’s algorithm quickly matched Wood, who’d been working in sales at Google and had just been admitted to Stanford University’s business school, with Tracy Thomas, an employee at a Bay Area startup with a wardrobe straight out of preppy clothier Vineyard Vines. Within a week, they’d arranged to meet at a tennis tournament. Sushi, drinks, and frozen yogurt followed. Three years later, they’re engaged and living in Los Angeles while Thomas wraps up his own business degree. “It was important to me that someone I was going on a date with was well-educated and driven, and had a lot of the same goals I did,” says Wood, who now runs a lifestyle blog and coaching service called Brains Over Blonde. “I have big career ambitions, and that had, in the past, intimidated—scared away—people I’d dated.”

The League is among a new crop of elite dating apps whose business models are predicated on the age-old reality that courtship is partly an economic exercise. The services are facilitating unions between educated, affluent millennials who are clustering in such cities as San Francisco and New York. In the process, they could be helping to intensify America’s growing income inequality, as well as wealth disparities between metropolitan areas and the rest of the country. Dating apps “help you find exactly what you want,” says Tyler Cowen, an economist at George Mason University who has broached the topic on several occasions on Marginal Revolution, a popular blog he co-hosts. Now, “you marry a college professor across town, a lawyer in D.C., rather than someone you work with or someone your brother-in-law matched you up with.” (Cowen is also a columnist for Bloomberg.)”

More videos