UN appeals for almost 8 billion dollars for Syrian humanitarian aid

UN agencies appealed for 7.73 billion dollars Tuesday to fund humanitarian operations in and around Syria in 2016 as the conflict is soon entering its sixth year.

UN humanitarian and development agencies made the appeal to the international community ahead of a Syria pledging conference in London on February 4.

The money would go towards funding aid operations in and outside of Syria. Just over 4.5 billion dollars are needed to assist the 4.7 million Syrians who have fled to neighbouring countries, while 3.2 billion dollars are required to provide humanitarian support to the 13.5 million people displaced or otherwise affected inside the country.

The Syria conference in February "will be an opportunity to shine a light on the human impact of the conflict, particularly on women, girls and young people," said Stephen O'Brien, UN humanitarian chief.

"It will rally support for accountability for abuses against civilians and the failure to protect them. I urge member states to send senior leaders to London to show the world that this crisis has our full attention and commitment."

Last update: Wed, 13/01/2016 - 11:39
Author: 

Related

More from World

Trump says he doesn't like tweeting, then tweets some more

More than 20 million people follow Donald Trump's Twitter account, but the US president-elect seems to consider...

Colombia reaches deal to begin peace talks with ELN rebels

Colombia and the ELN (National Liberation Army) rebel group have reached an agreement to begin peace negotiations...

Trump's UN ambassador pick expresses concern about Israel's treatment

South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley, Donald Trump's pick to serve as US ambassador to the UN, expressed concern...

Liberation of east Mosul nearly complete, Iraq's al-Abadi says

Iraqi security forces are close to ending Islamic State resistance on the east bank of the Tigris river in Mosul,...

Presidential powers: What Trump can and can't do

The powers of US presidents are relatively constrained, legally, compared to leaders in many other democracies.