brussels, aerodrom, police, eksplozija.jpg
Photograph: EPA/BORIS ROESSLER

Departures and arrivals picked up pace Monday at the Brussels international airport, following its partial reopening the previous day in the wake of suicide bombing attacks last month that killed more than 30 victims in the Belgian capital.

On March 22, two attackers blew themselves up in the departure hall of the Brussels Zaventem airport, while a third set off an explosion at an underground station in town. A later blast at the airport caused further damage, but injured no one.

The attacks killed 32, in addition to the three bombers. The Islamic State extremist group has claimed responsibility.

Following the attack, the airport has set up a temporary check-in zone. The arrivals and baggage collection areas suffered little damage.

Around 40 flights are scheduled to arrive and depart on Monday, an airport spokeswoman told dpa, with around 100 expected for Tuesday. At present, only Brussels Airlines and partner flights are operating from Zaventem, with other airlines to resume their operations over the coming days.

However, no public transport services were running to or from the airport on Monday, located to the northeast of Brussels, leaving only car and taxi services available.

The airport had formally reopened on Sunday, with three passenger flights departing for the Portuguese city of Faro, Turin in Italy and the Greek capital Athens.

Arriving vehicles had to pass through several control points and passengers underwent security screenings before entering the airport buildings, media reported.

Latest news

US strongly condemns neo-Nazi march in Zagreb

The US Embassy in Zagreb on Monday strongly condemned neo-Nazi and pro-Ustasha views expressed during a demonstration by several dozen people, organised by the non-parliamentary far-right Autochthonous Croatian Party of Rights (A-HSP) in Zagreb on Sunday.

Guterres: Rights of minorities, migrants are under attack

The human rights of minorities and migrants are being attacked by populists and by governments that shirk their responsibilities to protect refugees, UN chief Antonio Guterres said Monday at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva.

Carnival float crashes in Rio, injures 20

A large float crashed into revellers at Rio de Janeiro's Carnival celebrations, injuring 20 people, eight of them so seriously that they had to be taken to hospital, the news portal O Globo reported on Monday.

Al-Qaeda's deputy leader killed in Syria, monitor group says

Al-Qaeda's second-in-command, who goes by the name of Abu al-Khayr al-Masri, has been killed in a drone strike in northwestern Syria, a monitoring group said Monday.

Taiwan rights activists urge 'truth and justive' over 1947 massacre

Over 300 members of human rights and civil organizations urged the Taiwan government on Monday to finally deliver "truth and justice" for the victims of the February 28 massacre of 1947 and the following four decades of martial rule. 

Video purportedly shows beheading of German hostage in Philippines

A video shot by Islamist militants purportedly shows the beheading of a German hostage held for three months in the southern Philippines.

Seven killed in attack on prison bus in Sri Lanka

Seven people were killed Monday when unidentified gunmen disguised as police officers opened fire on a convoy transporting prisoners to a court south of Sri Lanka's capital, officials said.

South Korea's acting president refuses to extend Park investigation

Acting South Korean President Hwang Kyo Ahn refused to extend a special prosecutor's investigation into a scandal involving impeached President Park Geun Hye on Monday.

PricewaterhouseCoopers 'investigating' Oscar envelope mixup

Representatives at PricewaterhouseCoopers, the accounting firm responsible for carrying the winning ballots to the Academy Awards, "deeply regret" the confusion that ensued when Warren Beatty read out "La La Land" instead of "Moonlight" for Best Picture.

Croatia's development bank giving favourable loans for tourism

The Croatian Bank for Reconstruction and Development (HBOR) is continuing the implementation of programmes offering favourable loans to the tourism sector in 2017, with the continued reduction of interest rate by one percentage point and lower fees for loan applications, HBOR has stated.

New Zealand PM: We need migrants as 'locals can't pass drug tests'

New Zealand Prime Minister Bill English said Monday his country has to rely on immigrant workers because many locals can't pass workplace drug tests.

Father of dead Navy SEAL says he didn't want to meet with Trump

The father of a Navy SEAL killed in late January during a raid in Yemen chose not to meet US President Donald Trump when the soldier's casket arrived back in the United States, the Miami Herald reported Sunday.